The first European revolution–II

We have seen in the previous post some significant characteristics of the Gregorian reforms. Several observations can be made concerning these reforms, both in the three areas separately identified... Read More | Share

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The first European revolution–I

(An important source for this post is Karl F. Morrison’s “The Gregorian Reform” published in Christian Spirituality, Origins to the Twelfth Century, New York, 1988.) The Gregorian... Read More | Share

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Europe is cultural, not geographical

We often hear a wide diversity of arguments put forth in particular regarding the expansion of the European Union, but not only. What is Europe? Where does it start, and where does it end?... Read More | Share

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The First Great Divergence

“…for here it is precisely the element of the unexpected in the events I have chosen to describe which will challenge and stimulate everyone alike…” Polybius Polybius’... Read More | Share

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Ancient chants of the Church of Rome

These chants may sound both familiar and unfamiliar at first, but they date to a time when the Church Apostolic and Catholic was one, when Rome had not shaken off the Grace off of itself.... Read More | Share

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A Judeo-Christian nation?

“First, did America ever consider itself a Judeo-Christian nation? Secondly, if it did, what was the moment or event in which it ceased to do so?” This is the question Rep. Forbes asked... Read More | Share

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History knows no boundaries

We have all learnt at school the three great historical periods of history: Antiquity, Middle Ages, and Modern times. Antiquity, finishing in 476 with the fall of the Roman Empire, gave way to the... Read More | Share

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